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   Logo Center for Corporate Policy
   PO Box 19405, Washington, DC 20036     1.202.387.8030 V.   1.202.234.5176 Fax

The Center for Corporate Policy is a non-profit, non-partisan public interest organization working to curb corporate abuses and make corporations publicly accountable.

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    Current Issues

Stop the War Profiteers. No-bid contracts given out to corporations with connections to the administration, and recent reports about cost overruns and shoddy reconstruction suggest the need for stronger accountability and transparency. In addition, companies that avoid paying their fair share in taxes or have a history of violations of law should be deemed ineligible for taxpayer-funded contracts. For more information click HERE.

Crack Down on Corporate Bribery. The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (15 U.S.C.S. 78dd-1, 78dd-2, and 78dd-3) prohibits payments to foreign officials to "obtain or retain business." But ambiguities in the law have allowed defendants to claim an exemption for payments that don't expressly "assist such issuer in obtaining or retaining business," including payments to reduce customs duties or tax obligations. For more information click HERE.

Crack Down on Corporate Crime. After Enron and other scandals, there is still much that can be done to crack down on corporate crime. Congress should close the loopholes in Sarbanes-Oxley that allow auditing firms to continue tax and other kinds of consulting for the same clients. The federal government should use its purchasing power to bar corporate criminals from eligibility for government contracts. Payments and settlements for violations of the law should not be tax deductible. The FBI should establish an on-line corporate crime database and produce an annual report on corporate crime, the same way it reports on street crime, which costs far less. Click HERE for more.

            Time to Fix the Foreign Bribery Law

Recent news reports suggest that Halliburton may have paid bribes to Nigerian officials while Dick Cheney was CEO. But loopholes in the law may mean the company will walk away from this potential scandal unpunished. MORE.

    

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